Blockchain and the Global CIO

Report Overview

Author: Oliver Bussmann
Release Date: January 22, 2018

Abstract:

This research anticipates blockchain’s impact on enterprise IT architecture and the role of the chief information officer, sometimes called the chief technology officer or chief digital officer. It examines “low-hanging fruit,” that is, use cases where processes are ripe for change, volumes are predictably low, and the potential rewards are large. It also explores the coming convergence of emerging technologies–artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, and Internet of Things–and how those will catalyze distributed business models based on decentralized structures and disintermediated transactions. Finally, it provides a digital competency framework for organizations.

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