Blockchain for Planetary Stewardship, Part 2/2

Research Overview

Author: Tom Baumann
Release Date: January 30, 2018

Abstract:

This project surveys the landscape of blockchain start-ups, applications, and networks related to climate, sustainability, and governance of planetary resources. It speaks to leaders of green initiatives and heads of corporate social responsibility programs who want to explore distributed ledgers for their coordinating members of their ecosystems. It also introduces innovators to their peers’ work—not just Climatecoin, Grid+, and LO3 Energy but thirty other endeavors including think tanks, trading platforms, and environment-related cryptocurrencies.

Copyright 2018 Blockchain Research Institute – not for distribution

Blockchain for Planetary Stewardship

Copyright 2018 Blockchain Research Institute ™.
This infographic is exclusively available for distribution to employees of BRI member organization.

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