Blockchain in Global Trade

Research Overview

Author: Soumak Chatterjee, Louisa Bai, Vikas Singla, Kshitish Balhotra, Neha Bhasin, Cara Engelbrecht
Release Date: April 19, 2019

Abstract:

This research explores how blockchain can improve global trade for all stakeholders—banks and financiers, corporations, logistics companies, regulatory bodies, insurance providers, and customs authorities—and lays out a road map for implementation on business and technical fronts. Deloitte’s technology consulting team provides provocative questions for enterprise leadership and practical analysis of blockchain opportunities and such challenges as governance, standards, scalability, interoperability, and integration.

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