Enabling Enterprise Transformation with Blockchain

Research Overview

Author: Anthony D. Williams, Ricardo Viana Vargas, Edivandro Carlos Conforto, Tahirou Assane Oumarou
Release Date: March 23, 2020

Abstract:

This research focuses on blockchain as a platform for enterprise transformation in terms of operations, organizational structure, systems integration, new product development, and business model innovation. The featured case study shows how Canada’s largest digital payments company is using blockchain to seize new opportunities in the highly regulated energy and health care sectors, primarily through a blockchain-powered app that offers consumers monetary incentives paid in real time for changing their behavior. The case underscores the importance of organizational governance, culture, and fresh approaches to accessing skills and talent.

Copyright 2020 Blockchain Research Institute – not for distribution

Enterprise Transformation Infographic

Copyright 2020 Blockchain Research Institute ™.
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